Was it said about MARC or BIBFRAME?

MARC_BIBFRAME

Below are answers to and citation information for the quiz I gave during my “Machine Readable Moments” paper at SHARP 2017.

Please find the quiz here:  https://goo.gl/forms/Ne0Vd3z5tj92vtwW2

  1. MARC: “…[T]he search for a specific item …. can yield a rich and perhaps unsuspected harvest of related items, and opportunities for discovery are further multiplied by the elaborate system of cross references between authors and headings”

Robin Alston and M. J. Jannetta, Bibliography, Machine Readable Cataloguing and the ESTC: A Summary History of the Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalogue: Working Methods, Cataloguing Rules ; A Catalogue of the Works of Alexander Pope Printed between 1711 and 1800 in the British Library (London: The British Library, 1978).

2. BIBFRAME: “Linked Data is a solution looking for a problem.”

Adam Chandler in Edmunds, Jeffrey, “Bibframe as Empty Vessel,” February 23, 2017, https://drive.google.com/drive/search?q=Vessel.

3. BIBFRAME: “Surely a new model cannot be successful without the consideration (or even better, the participation) of the people who will spend their days using the new data model to create the library’s data.”

Coyle, Karen. “Coyle’s InFormation: If It Ain’t Broke.” Coyle’s InFormation, April 12, 2017. http://kcoyle.blogspot.com/2017/04/if-it-aint-broke.html.

4. MARC: “The development of our systems is like finding the value of pi to one more decimal place, one more step toward total knowledge.”

Earl R. Taylor, “Cataloging and Computers: Librarians and Cyberphobia,” Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America 75, no. 4 (1981): 392–400.

5. MARC: “Perhaps we do not yet fully appreciate the situation, now rapidly materializing, whereby computers converse with each other in any mode, while the rest of us, mere mortals stand mute before them.”

William B. Todd, “The ESTC as Viewed by Administrators and Scholars,” The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 75, no. 4 (1981): 389–92.

6. BIBFRAME: “The proposed BIBFRAME model encourages the creation of clearly identified entities and the use of machine-friendly identifiers which lend themselves to machine interpretation for those entities.”

Library of Congress. “Bibliographic Framework as a Web of Data: Linked Data Model and Supporting Services,” 2012. http://www.loc.gov/bibframe/pdf/marcld-report-11-21-2012.pdf.

7. MARC: “The extent of human knowledge has become unmanageably enormous. Simply stated this body of knowledge is an ocean upon which librarians and bibliographers have navigated with antique instruments and medieval charts…”

Earl R. Taylor, “Cataloging and Computers: Librarians and Cyberphobia,” Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America 75, no. 4 (1981): 392–400.

8. MARC: “This mode of production would relieve humans of the drudgery of preparing the catalogs, make the information more rapidly available and provide the facility for additional access points to the data.”

Avram, Henriette D. MARC, Its History and Implications /. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1975. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015034388556.

9. BIBFRAME: “The catch-22 is obvious: adoption of BIBFRAME depends, at least in part, on systems that support it, but widespread adoption is unlikely in the absence of systems that support it–and have been shown through implementation and real-world testing to add value to the bibliographic universe.”

Edmunds, Jeffrey, “Bibframe as Empty Vessel,” February 23, 2017, https://drive.google.com/drive/search?q=Vessel.

10. MARC: “This fear [of new technology] is not one to belittle. After all, no one knows what shapes shadows may take in the dark….In the modern age one clutches at the flag of fear because of the very real belief that somebody else will allow the computer to think for [them].”

Earl R. Taylor, “Cataloging and Computers: Librarians and Cyberphobia,” Papers of the Bibliographic Society of America 75, no. 4 (1981): 392–400.